What are your views on breatharianism?

Posted

Back to blog posts

I find breatharianism to be a highly excess yin practice, and therefore the people who practice breatharianism will be highly excess yin in nature.  For example, they most likely won’t own many possessions and belongings such as clothes and shoes (yang); they will be anti-money and wealth (yang), and they will likely only focus on the yin aspects of life such as spirituality, the non-physical realm, and oneness consciousness.  In turn, they are likely to suppress, repress, reject, and deny the yang, separation aspects of life. 

People who are excess yin tend to look at the yin, spiritual aspects of life (one side of the divinity coin), such as the non-physical realm, soul, spirit, prana, and life-force energy as equating to “enlightenment” and divine.  In turn, they tend to look at the yang, earthly aspects of life (the other side of the divinity coin), such as the physical realm, the mind, food, clothes, money, and wealth as equating to “unenlightened” and not a part of the divine.  Missing the important point that everything – you name it – everything equates to the divine/all there is.

So, excess yin people tend to view very yin practices, such as meditation and fasting (withdrawal of food) as being a path towards “enlightenment” (because they tend to believe that only the spiritual aspects of life, the non-physical aspects of life, and oneness consciousness equates to the divine).  In turn, they tend to view very yang practices, such as accumulating wealth, money, possessions, and belongings as being “unenlightened” (because they believe that the physical, separation consciousness is not a part of the divine).  

I want to be clear that yin practices, such as meditation and fasting can open the self up more to the non-physical, spiritual realm – which is fine; it’s ok to explore the yin spiritual aspect of life in this way. However, the issue is when we go to the extreme and only associate with the yin aspects of life which means we subsequently suppress, repress, reject, and deny the yang aspect of life which will shift us to excess yin in nature and therefore deficient yang (which then creates excess polarity both within the self and without in other people and the world all around us).

Breatharianism is an extreme yin practice because it involves not consuming any food whatsoever.  Instead, breatharians only live on air or universal energy (prana, qi, life force energy – all the same thing, just different words).  Food is yang because it is physical and it’s what our physical body (yang) needs in order to survive here in the physical realm.  

When we sub-divine yang into the yin aspect of yang and the yang aspect of yang, we can also place different foods in these sub-categories.  Therefore, lighter foods, such as fruits and vegetables fall into the yin aspect of yang; and denser foods, such as dairy, fish and meat are the yang aspect of yang.  We can also sub-divine further, such as lighter fruits and vegetables (yin) and denser, higher-fat fruits and vegetables (yang); or fish (yin) and meat (yang).  

Those who are more yin in nature tend to have more yin diets and those who are more yang in nature tend to have more yang diets.  When people are excess yin, they tend to suppress, oppress, reject, deny and ridicule those who have more yang diets such as meat-eaters (missing the point that excess yang is their own rejected mirror self – their repressed shadow self which they naturally won’t like when they see these dominant or excess yang traits in others); and when people are excess yang in nature they tend to suppress, oppress, reject, deny and ridicule those who have more yin diets such as veganism (missing the point that excess yin is their own rejected mirror self – their repressed shadow self which they naturally won’t like when they see these dominant or excess yin traits in others). 

Overall, we all have different body chemistry, therefore we all need different diets to suit our unique and individual bodily systems (both physical and non-physical bodily systems). There is no one-size-fits-all, so we each need to find a diet that suits our individual bodies best, but without going to extremes!  For example, people who only “eat” air (extreme excess yin) are the complete polar opposite of those who only eat red raw meat (extreme excess yang).

I find that people who are dominant yin in nature naturally need to eat more lighter foods because heavier denser foods tend to make them sluggish and sleepy.  Whereas people who are more dominant yang naturally need to eat more denser foods because lighter foods don’t give them enough energy to keep them going throughout the day (although this is really only a very general perspective). It’s really about finding that right balance that works best for you, individually, as well as keeping in mind that we also need to find the right balance between yin and yang (in all areas of life).    

Overall, the topic of diet is very broad; however, the main point is that no one diet fits all.  The goal in general, in any area of life, is to become aware of life from a yin and yang perspective and then aim for that middle ground of balance, harmony and wholeness.  It’s this middle ground where we find and achieve self-mastery.